About (or: who, what, why?)

Who:

I’m a father and lawyer and yogi.  I am told the circumstances of my life should cause ridiculous amounts of stress:

  • I moved 11 times in 20 years;
  • I have a son with profound needs who has had 13 surgeries in his 14 years; he is deaf and at 14 he cannot walk or eat and wears a diaper.  His condition involves repeated medical emergencies and has been very emotional for my wife and I.
  • For 14 years I have rarely slept through a night without getting up to help my son at least once.
  • I gave up a good job and went into debt to go to law school in my late thirties — with my son and (very supportive) wife.
  • Since then I have worked long hours at a job that includes arguing in front of Judges — while living in one of the most expensive and busy cities in the United States.

And yet, I have kept my marriage, my health, my job, and my son.  My experiences during this time  lead me to believe that this survival has been due in part to my practice of yoga.


What:

This blog includes things I’ve learned about how all the practices of yoga (not just the Asana poses) interact with my body, emotions, and mind to help support calmness and happiness in the midst of struggle, sadness, and stress.

Many of the posts are notes I have made to myself over the past decade; others are things I am learning right now.  I call them “experiments” because many of them are things I have tried out on myself — sometimes repeatedly — and my notes record the results. 

Why:

Yoga is a practice, not a perfection.  If yoga is your path you cannot let yourself get lazy and fall into a routine or you will immediately succumb to unhealthy habits, anxiety, and stress.  My path over the past decade has been a series of up and down cycles: between a practice that is mindful and inspired on the one hand, and falling into a mindless routine on the other.  Writing and reading about yoga is a key component of the practice of Svadhyaya.   This blog is one attempt to maintain a mindful, diligent focus on my practice.

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